Top 6 Types of Shots in Product Photography and Their Benefits

By on October 9, 2012 — Updated on September 8, 2013

Val’s wife prepared a sunny side up for breakfast, sunny side up for lunch and sunny side up for dinner. On the next morning, when Val came in the dining room and sat before the dining table for breakfast, a golden egg yolk surrounded with egg white welcomed him – it’s a sunny side up again for breakfast.

With his face frowned, Val called his wife, “Honey, if we still have many stocks of egg, would you mind to serve scrambled egg for lunch, salted egg for dinner and boil my eggs for tomorrow’s breakfast?

This is the danger of marrying a woman who has little cooking know-how. ^_^

Who doesn’t love variety? No one.

Everyone loves to be served with different dish from what he has eaten this morning. Everyone loves to taste different flavors. Everyone loves to see different styles. Everyone loves variety.

You love variety. Don’t you?

The different types of shots in product photography are as important as different types of dishes served every meal. Why? To avoiding losing your audience ‘appetite’ and to capture photos according to their purpose.

Below are the the types of shots in product photography and their benefits.

Product Photography

1. Group Shot

Obviously this is the type of shot intended for a group of products, composed of two items and above. Though there are marketers who discourage taking photos of products in group because it lessens the value as what they said, this type of shot is still useful for a set of products like porcelain tea set, dinner set, cutlery set and other similar items.

Group shot is also used for items in the same product line or products that are packed in different quantities. Example, the 1 liter, 500ml, 350ml, 50ml and a sachet of an anti-dandruff shampoo can be photograph as one group if the purpose is to show the available range of product.

2. Individual Shot

One item is shoot at a time. This the opposite of the group shot. Individual shot is done to give emphasis to every item or if the items are be priced or promoted individually.

3. Components Shot

This is done for the components of a certain product. Say for example the product is a 3-in-1 food processor (blender, mixer, dough-maker), after taking the photo of the whole product, you also need to shoot its components like the blades, mixing bowl and the dough maker. Another example is the shot for a remote control on an electric fan.

4. Series Shot

It is done for 360 degrees rotational or for animated products photos used online or on html presentation.  The product is shot in series position and the photos are arranged in image processing software, usually Adobe Photoshop. When the animation is set, the image is saved in GIF file format. Instead of using GIF, some company use flash for the animation.

5. Detail Shot

It is the close-up of some parts or the features of the product such as an ergonomic button, detail of the fiber of fabric, the label, a unique design, patented part of the item and the carving the body of the item.

6. Teaser Shot

It is often done with artistic appeal. The purpose of this shot is to get the interest of the viewer. This type of shot is often used as brochure cover, catalogue category divider and packaging graphic design. Teaser shot is usually done with props and is set up to suggest usage of the product and the lifestyle that the product fits into.

Serve your audience’s eyes with variety. Show them different types of shots to avoid monotony.



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One Comment

  1. Forry Burgue

    October 11, 2012 at 12:21 am

    Variation is very important indeed, and it is a common mistake for beginners to stick on the same type of shot throughout a photo-shoot.

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